By Yankuba Jallow/ Isatou Ceesay-Bah

Commotion erupted at the premises of the Banjul Magistrates Court just minutes following Abdoulie Saine’s trial.

During the trial, the court house was over-crowded. There was no electricity and almost everyone was seen sweating.

After the case, many people were seen blocking the passage of Abdoulie Saine reknownly called Lie Saine which triggered his loved ones to intervene to rescue him from being harmed.

Many people were heard saying “he should not be bailed’ whilst some others were saying “he should be left to go untouched”.

The Commotion started and happened in the presence of security officers including members of the Gambia Police Force who were seen armed.

Speaking to Foroyaa, some of the people who wanted to assault Lie Saine, said: Lie Saine is rude. How can he insult another ethnolinguistic group.

Speaking to Foroyaa, some people from Saine’s side indicated they would ensure that Lie Saine is not harmed.

The case was attended by over 300 people including members of APRC.

Meanwhile at the trial itself, Abdoulie Saine pleaded not guilty to all counts including charges on seditious intention. The former National Assembly Member for Banjul Central, faces two counts: Count One on incitement to violence and Count two, on seditious intention.

According to the particulars of offence on Count 1, Abdoulie Saine on or about the 2nd of November 2018, in the City of Banjul, without lawful excuse and with intent to incite violence, uttered a statement on ‘Whatsapp’ audio, using abusive and derogative remarks against an entire tribe, stating their selfishness, hypocrisy and wickedness people.

On Count 2, Abdoulie Saine on the same day and place without lawful excuse and with intent to promote feelings of ill-will and hostility between the different classes of the population of the Gambia, uttered a statement on ‘Whatsapp’ audio using abusive and derogative remarks against an entire tribe, stating their selfishness, hypocrisy and wickedness.

When the charges were read before Magistrates T. Wilson and M. Jarju of the Banjul Magistrates Court for the accused to take his plea, Saine made an application for an adjournment which was objected to by Lead prosecutor, Superintendent MB Mballow, for the Inspector General of Police.

In his application, Saine said his Counsel was in Brikama and couldn’t make it on time for his case. He urged the Court to grant him one day’s adjournment. In his counter application, Prosecutor Mballow said Counsels owe the Courts an obligation; that it is mandatory for them to be present in Court; that plea taking is personal and the accused person can take a plea, in the absence of his Counsel.

Trial Magistrate T. Wilson in her ruling, stated that the case should proceed; that the Defence Lawyer should have communicated to the Court in his absence.

After taking his plea, the prosecution applied for an adjournment to enable them secure a fiat, from the Attorney General as required by the Criminal Procedure Code.

Meanwhile commotion erupted at the premises of the Courts just minutes following Saine’s trial.

During the trial, the Court house was over-crowded. There was no electricity and almost everyone could be seen sweating. After the case, people blocked Saine’s passage triggering his loved ones to intervene to rescue him from getting harmed. People were also heard shouting that he should not be granted bail whilst others shouted that he should be left to go free. The commotion happened in the presence of security officers including members of the Gambia Police Force, who were armed.

Some people who spoke to this medium, said Saine, they said: Lie Saine was rude in insulting another ethno-linguistic group, and were there to show him that Jammeh’s era has passed and questioned why he was granted bail.

People on Saine’s side who also spoke to this medium, said they will not fold their arms to see irresponsible people harm their loved one; that they will not attack anyone but that no one will also touch him in their presence.

The former Mayor of KMC who doubles as the National Mobiliser for the APRC, Yankuba Colley seen beseeching people to be calm. He was taken away by plain cloth officers from the scene.

The case was attended by a capacity crowd that included members of APRC, and adjourned to the 20th day of September 2018, at 1pm for continuation.

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