Most Gambians who were committed to electoral reform and political change were united in promoting constitutional and legal reform, protection of fundamental rights and due process and the introduction of transitional justice to remedy past injustices. Now that Commissions are established to review the Constitution, commence the process of transitional justice and protect human rights, most people had anticipated that any transition programme will give priority to constitutional and legal reform, security sector reform, civil service reform and electoral reform.

It was envisaged that these reforms would be prioritised and achieved within the first two years of the transitional administration. It is almost two years but the institutions are yet to be grounded. What is the problem? The state should explain why all those Commissions are not moving with accelerated power of motion.

The Executive is constantly emphasizing the sum pledged to assist development priorities. However we are yet to be informed how much has been mobilised for the Truth, Reconciliation and Reparation Commission, the Constitutional Review Commission and the Human Rights Commission to facilitate their work. The Commissions or the state should issue a press to indicate the true state of affairs of the various units.

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